Climate change

  • by Patrick Mazza on February 20, 2013
    Global biodiversity avatar Thomas Lovejoy sees a climate endgame in sight, title of his recent New York Times op-ed. Lovejoy points to biocarbon, nature’s capacity to capture and store carbon through plant growth. Read more
  • by Eileen V. Quigley on February 13, 2013
    Working with numerous Northwest cities over the past four years, the New Energy Cities team has learned many lessons about how cities can accelerate the adoption of climate-smart, clean energy solutions. However, none was more instructive than the need for setting a clear, aggressive greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction with metrics. I know how process-heavy this sounds, but stay with me because this is really important. Read more
  • by Eileen V. Quigley on February 6, 2013
    In the absence of national climate and energy policy, US local and regional leaders are developing the climate and clean energy policies, strategies, and projects required to reduce carbon emissions and the state of California is the gold standard for climate policy leadership and community-supported clean energy innovation. The state has set specific goals and targets, requires participation of cities in achieving those goals, and supports communities with specific, effective energy efficiency and clean energy programs. Read more
  • by Elizabeth Willmott on January 30, 2013
    City officials who want to address climate change know that lowering the carbon emissions in the built environment requires bold steps—especially in the context of population growth and increased development. Well-intentioned city officials often sign up for aggressive city climate action plans, but then falter when it comes to implementation. One exceptional stand-out is Issaquah, WA (population 24,930), where the City’s leaders are confronting carbon emissions head-on. Read more
  • by Elizabeth Willmott on January 16, 2013
    Cities account for 70 percent of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which means that helping cities tackle GHG reduction is mission critical. At the New Energy Cities program, we work with small- to medium-sized Northwest cities to reduce carbon emissions by accelerating climate-smart, clean energy solutions in eco-mobility, renewable energy, highly efficient and intelligent buildings, and smart grid technology.  Here’s our approach: Read more
  • by Eileen V. Quigley on January 9, 2013
    As 2013 gets underway, the United States continues to operate without national climate or energy policies, nor national carbon pricing. Read more
  • by Patrick Mazza on December 7, 2012
    How much carbon is stored in natural systems of the continental western US?  How much will be stored in future decades? A new US Geological Service survey provides some sobering answers. Read more
  • by Laurie Wayburn on November 29, 2012
    Imagine a world where we invest billions of dollars in improving ecosystem resilience to help combat climate change, all because doing so sucks up vast amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) and provides pure oxygen in return. Read more
  • by Steve Whitney on August 6, 2012
    Lost in the current debate over how best to control greenhouse gas emissions from combustion of fossil fuels is the simple fact that it won’t be enough. Already, concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere exceed 390 parts per million (ppm), some 40 ppm above what many climate scientists consider safe levels. Read more
  • by KC Golden on November 8, 2011
    As dusk settled on Lafayette Park last Sunday, after the successful “encirclement” of the White House, Bill McKibben was at the mic, wrapping up last Sunday’s inspiring “encirclement” of the White House – a “hug” for the President, urging him to reject the Keystone pipeline.  His voice was full of grateful pride. Just as he was wrapping up, he was interrupted by a message:  the President’s motorcade was passing the north side of the park.  Thousands still remaining in the park turned away from the stage and ran north toward the motorcade, shouting “Yes we can….Stop the Pipeline.” Read more

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