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JON D. ANDERSON

The Washington State House budget needs climate action

The Washington State House has released a state budget for the next two years, but something is conspicuously absent: a price on carbon. Without including the carbon charge from the Carbon Pollution Accountability Act, the House budget misses an opportunity to hold major emitters accountable and fully invest in our communities. Legislative leaders insist they are continuing to work on a carbon pricing policy, and we need to hold them to their word.
 
Join us in asking that the Legislature include carbon pricing in the budget for a healthy, prosperous and just Washington. Call them now (1-800-562-6000) and ask your representative for a budget that holds emitters accountable and addresses climate change.
 
Our state budget should reflect our values and priorities. In Washington, that means healthy air, a clean and sustainable economy and thriving communities. The Carbon Pollution Accountability Act achieves those goals by ending free carbon dumping by the largest emitters, and investing in education, clean transportation and the Working Families Tax Rebate. Reducing pollution and protecting our communities from climate change is what will move Washington forward.
 
Our budget should hold emitters accountable and invest in Washington communities. Our budget should include the Carbon Pollution Accountability Act. Call the legislative hotline now (1-800-562-6000) and ask your representative to include a carbon charge in the budget.
 
We know Washington is in need of new revenue to provide the education, health and transportation system our future demands, but to invest in that future without addressing climate change is a mistake. Charging for emissions will protect our children’s future from the impacts of climate change and help fund the schools and jobs they deserve.
 
We are committed to designing an equitable framework for climate action that fully funds the Working Families Tax Rebate, so those hit hardest by the costs of global warming can more easily transition to the clean energy economy. And we are committed to working with the Legislature to account for the price of carbon in our economy.

We hope you will join us in continuing this fight.

Jessica Finn Coven's picture

Washington State Director

, Climate Solutions

Jessica Finn Coven is Director of the City of Seattle's Office of Sustainability & Environment.

Jessica previously served as the Washington State Director of Climate Solutions where her work focused on developing legislative and policy strategies to reduce global warming pollution and grow an equitable clean-energy economy in Washington State. Jessica first joined Climate Solutions in 2007 as a policy specialist and worked to further clean energy policy in Washington through the state’s Energy Independence Act, Climate Action and Green Jobs law and others.

Jessica also worked as the program director for the U.S. Climate Action Network. From 2002- 2005, she was a global warming campaigner for Greenpeace in Washington DC. She also spent several months working in Beijing as a policy advisor for Greenpeace China.

Jessica received her MA in economics and energy policy from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and her BA in Mandarin from Barnard College, Columbia University.

Jessica currently sits on the board of Washington Conservation Voters. She lives in Seattle with her husband, young son and old dog.