Lummi treaty rights

PAUL K ANDERSON

Will you stand with the Lummi Nation against coal exports?

The Lummi Nation began the New Year by formally requesting that the US Army Corps of Engineers deny a permit to build North America’s largest coal export terminal on the shores of Cherry Point because the impacts to tribal fishing cannot be mitigated. Approval of the permit, the Tribe argues, would be a violation of their treaty rights.

Now seven months have passed, and recently, Senator Daines of Montana tried to put up obstacles to this request in a letter to the Army Corps. The coal companies are trying to use their power in Washington DC, but here in the Pacific Northwest we know that those of us who are affected by coal exports deserve to be heard and protected.

It is more important than ever to show your support of the Lummi's treaty rights, and their efforts to keep dirty, dangerous coal exports out of our communities and our waters.​

Please write to the Army Corps and ask them to uphold their responsibility and uphold treaty rights, and to make a decision quickly.

The proposed Cherry Point coal export terminal would have harmful effects on rich fishing grounds that support hundreds of family businesses. In addition to providing more than a thousand jobs, fishing is also a vital part of the cultural heritage of area tribes. The Lummi people are working hard to preserve their language, to resurrect traditional fishing traditions, and to educate Lummi youth about their culture.

Write to the Army Corps today and ask them to support the protection of the Lummi Nation’s treaty rights.

Together, we can protect our communities from dirty and dangerous coal exports.

Joëlle Robinson's picture

Field Director

, Climate Solutions

Joëlle engages citizens and diverse constituencies—faith, health, veteran, youth, parents, sportsmen, business—to make their voices heard for climate solutions. She led local field work collaboration with our partners toward passing a federal climate bill, and is currently working to ensure we stop any coal export from the U.S. West Coast.

Joëlle was the Regional Outreach Coordinator of National Wildlife Federation where she focused on mobilizing hunters, anglers and concerned citizens around solutions to global warming. Previous work with Climate Solutions includes the NW Climate Connections partnership, serving as the Field Assistant for the successful Clean Cars campaign, and Field Director of the Renewable Fuel Standard, which passed in April 2006.

She is a board member of Earth Ministry and on the Advisory Board for the Seattle Area Happiness Initiative. She previously served on the Solar Washington board and Sierra Club Executive Committee.

Joëlle is a Northwest native who loves to hike, bike, dance, paraglide, and travel. Her favorite quote is “Hope is borne of participating in hopeful solutions.” — Marianne Williamson.