Wind and solar = clean energy

Fossil free forward!

Nothing can be more clear: if we’re serious about tackling climate change, then we must transition away from the era of fossil fuels. This reality is both daunting and refreshing—daunting because of the tough climb ahead to transform our energy economy, and refreshing because of the prospect of a cleaner world, a stronger economy, more vibrant and liveable communities and healthier people.

It’s also within reach. Today in Olympia, committees in both the Senate and the House passed policies that would move us in the direction of 100% fossil-free electricity. The policies are very different. A Democrat is guiding one of them, and a Republican another—and with complete different structures—but they are unified behind a shared vision: we are getting off coal, oil and gas in our power sector.

This morning, the Senate Energy, Environment and Technology Committee approved one of these bills, sponsored by Senator Kevin Ranker and moved by Committee Chair Reuven Carlyle. If it becomes law, the bill would end the use of coal for Washington electricity in the next twelve years and set a path to zero-carbon power in our state by 2045.

The House Technology and Economic Development Committee approved the other policy this morning, with sponsorship from four Republican legislators—Reps. Richard Debolt, Norma Smith, Ed Orcutt and Cary Condotta; Committee Chair Jeff Morris moved the bill. This bill would prohibit any fossil fuel construction in the electricity sector starting in 2020.

These two policies don’t walk the path the same way, but these leaders know where we’re walking to. Clean energy consistently produces more employment per unit of energy produced than fossil fuels. A transition to cleaner power will secure us more stable electricity prices, and a sustainable future. The public is ready, and more and more policymakers are saying they are too.

The Washington Legislature adopted greenhouse gas emission limits in 2008. For our entire state’s economy to reach reductions of 80% below 1990 levels by 2050, as recommended by the University of Washington’s Climate Impacts Group, our electricity sector must achieve even deeper reductions, even as we electrify other sectors that currently rely on fossil fuels.

Four weeks of session to go. Onward!

 
Vlad Gutman-Britten's picture

Washington Director

, Climate Solutions

Vlad brings varied and deep experience in policy, advocacy, and campaign politics to his work at Climate Solutions. He is responsible for guiding policy development and building an integrated communications, advocacy, and government affairs strategy to foster a clean energy economy in Washington.

Before coming to Climate Solutions, Vlad was Senior Policy Director for the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition, where he successfully secured tens of millions of dollars in state investment in habitat and recreation lands. He was previously a key part of issue advocacy and communications efforts for large companies, including Microsoft and GE, and before that served as AIPAC's Deputy Midwest Political Director. A veteran campaign operative, he has run congressional and state legislative campaigns and worked on races ranging from mayoral to presidential.

Vlad is a graduate of Northwestern University, where he received a degree in political science. In his spare time, Vlad brews (and drinks) beer, listens to opera, and volunteers for the Washington Autism Alliance & Advocacy.