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Are we ready to handle all-electric transportation? You bet we are.
Research shows that a 100% clean electrical grid can handle the task of powering all-electric transportation. With smart charging practices and increased use of transit, the transition will reduce costs and improve our health—on top of the climate benefits. Part of our Transforming Transportation series.
Utilities
Photo of TriMet GM Sam Desue and Sen. Dembrow were joined by Metro Council President Lynn Peterson, Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega-Pederson, Portland General Electric President and CEO Maria Pope and Climate Solutions’ Oregon Director Meredith Connolly.

The role of renewable diesel in Oregon's climate plans

While we are putting all our efforts into transitioning our transportation sector to be made up of 100% zero-emission vehicles powered by renewable energy, this transformation will not happen overnight.

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Why Oregon’s climate progress is good, but still not enough

If you’re like me, you’ve seen a LOT of studies released about the increasingly dire state of our climate, what’s to come if we do not cut pollution, and how much pollution we need to cut by when. 

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Freeway expansion and climate action don't mix

Freeway expansion and climate action don’t mix As youth-organized climate protests against the Oregon Department of Transportation’s

Electric car rear

Are we ready to handle all-electric transportation? You bet we are.

Research shows that a 100% clean electrical grid can handle the task of powering all-electric transportation. With smart charging practices and increased use of transit, the transition will reduce costs and improve our health—on top of the climate benefits. Part of our Transforming Transportation series.

Photo of gas well flare

Voice Your Comments on NW Natural's Proposed Rate Increase

NW Natural—Oregon's largest fossil fuel utility—wants to raise gas prices by nearly 12 percent. By supporting further growth of the gas industry, this rate hike will increase energy burdens for already struggling Oregon families, worsen the climate crisis, and pollute the air we breathe.

Photo of sunrise over prairie, Mt. Adams Oregon

Two years ago today: One of biggest climate wins in Oregon history

Today is a significant milestone for Oregon’s climate progress, but it requires a little time traveling to the cusp of the pre-COVID times to fully appreciate how far we’ve come.

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Sprint with us toward climate action

Oregon's legislators heard your calls to address climate pollution from buildings—but it’s taking a new form. Also, don't miss updates on our statewide other climate priorities.

Yard sign that reads "We are going all electric"

Oregon’s “Future of Gas” Process: What Is It and Why Does It Matter?

Oregon PUC regulators are tasked with figuring out how to protect customers and reduce risk, while gas utilities grapple with how to meet climate pollution reduction goals while continuing to meet customers’ needs.

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Good climate moves from Eugene's city council

The Eugene, OR city council voted to start studying whether to require all new-constructed commercial and residential buildings be electric only.

collage of Mount Hood, a girl cleaning an electric induction stove, and solar panel installers

Turns out it’s a bad idea to burn fossil fuels inside our buildings too

As heat rises, fossil fuel pollution from Oregon’s buildings looms large.

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Photo of gas well flare

Voice Your Comments on NW Natural's Proposed Rate Increase

Submitted by Greer Ryan on Tue, 03/22/2022 - 16:52

NW Natural—Oregon's largest fossil fuel utility—wants to raise gas prices by nearly 12 percent. By supporting further growth of the gas industry, this rate hike will increase energy burdens for already struggling Oregon families, worsen the climate crisis, and pollute the air we breathe.
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