Rooftop solar photo
Solar accessibility to soar for Oregon’s lower-income households
The state of Oregon was recently awarded $86 million for rooftop solar projects for lower-income residents. The extra cool news: combined with existing federal and state solar incentive programs, this may bring the upfront costs of rooftop solar to nearly zero for many eligible households.
Utilities
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Solar accessibility to soar for Oregon’s lower-income households

The state of Oregon was recently awarded $86 million for rooftop solar projects for lower-income residents. The extra cool news: combined with existing federal and state solar incentive programs, this may bring the upfront costs of rooftop solar to nearly zero for many eligible households.

MAnaged Transition

A Managed and Timely Transition for WA's Gas Utilities

This report from Synapse and Climate Solutions provides an analysis of options for Washington's methane gas utilities and their transition to clean energy.

Photo of kindergarteners boarding an electric school bus

Kids breathe easier on electric school buses

Kids deserve to breathe clean, unpolluted air. Plenty of ink has already been spilled about the harms of polluted air in homes and classrooms. However, students are still routinely exposed to dirty, polluted air from a source in virtually every school district’s driveway: the school bus.

image of spring flowers with Mt Hood

Oregon’s Climate Wins in the 2023 Legislative Session

We saw success despite a challenging legislative environment that included a minority of Senators leading the longest walkout in Oregon’s history. Because the legislative calendar was down to the wire, many climate and clean energy bills were combined into two omnibus bills...

image of offshore wind turbines

Boundaries of potential Oregon Wind Energy Areas published

Oregon could benefit from new source of clean energy to reduce climate pollution and reduce fossil fuel dependency

image of a gas meter on a yellow wall

Advocates reach settlement with Avista to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, expand low-income efficiency programs

[PRESS RELEASE] A historic settlement in a contested rate case between Oregon’s second-largest gas utility and intervening organizations will require Avista to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, dramatically expand low-income weatherization programs and restrict political spending by the gas company that undermines state climate law.

image of a gas meter on a yellow wall

Public Comment Opportunity: Avista Gas Rate Hike

Avista is seeking to increase gas bills to expand the gas system when they should be shrinking it. Oregon has climate goals requiring gas utilities to slash pollution by 90% by 2050.

image of the capitol building in Salem with spring flowers

Speak up for Climate Action! Email your Legislator in Oregon

Did you know the Oregon Legislature hasn’t updated our state climate goals in over 15 years?

Photo of gas plant

Advocates urge Oregon regulators to reject NW Natural’s risky investment plan

In Support of Public Utility Commission Staff’s Analysis, Climate Advocates Call on Commissioners to Require the Major Gas Utility to Develop a Realistic Long-term Investment Plan to Meet State

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Photo of kindergarteners boarding an electric school bus

Kids breathe easier on electric school buses

Kids deserve to breathe clean, unpolluted air. Plenty of ink has already been spilled about the harms of polluted air in homes and classrooms. However, students are still routinely exposed to dirty, polluted air from a source in virtually every school district’s driveway: the school bus.
Read More

image of a gas meter on a yellow wall

Advocates reach settlement with Avista to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, expand low-income efficiency programs

Submitted by Greer Ryan on

[PRESS RELEASE] A historic settlement in a contested rate case between Oregon’s second-largest gas utility and intervening organizations will require Avista to phase out fossil fuel subsidies, dramatically expand low-income weatherization programs and restrict political spending by the gas company that undermines state climate law.
Read More