Controller burn in Oregon
It's the 11th hour for climate and Congress
The climate crisis seems to be getting worse, but we also know there is a window of time right now when we can still make a big positive difference.
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“Transition is inevitable.  Justice is not.”- Quinton Sankofa, Movement Generation 

Climate disruption isn’t an “environmental” issue in the usual sense.  It’s a basic matter of social and economic justice. 

The impacts of climate change generally hit first and worst on those who do the least to cause it and are the most vulnerable to the consequences.  And the primary cause of climate change–fossil fuel extraction, transportation and combustion–takes a heavy toll on the health and well-being of communities of color, indigenous people, and low-income communities.

So addressing the climate challenge means more than emission reduction, more than simply mitigating environmental impacts of our economic and energy systems. It means rebuilding those systems to deliver sustainable prosperity–economic health that works for a long time and a lot more people.

A clean energy economy can offer that promise. It can produce economic vitality in the present without destroying the future. It can produce shared prosperity, by reducing the concentrated economic power of fossil fuel suppliers, investing in communities, and increasing reliance on abundant local resources.

But this transition won’t be easy or quick. It’s a huge social and economic shift, and that always poses challenges, particularly for those who live closest to the economic margins and those who rely on fossil fuel industries for work. The clean energy transition is about shrinking carbon footprints, but it won’t work unless it’s also about growing:

  • Economic security
  • Opportunities for all – good work, strong local economies, shared prosperity
  • Affordable energy and transportation services
  • Healthier communities

 

photo of solar panels, wind turbines, and power lines against sky with sunrise

Creating a Wave--the Pacific Northwest Says Yes to 100% Clean Electricity

Our latest Climate Leaders Live webinar celebrated the Pacific Northwest as the first region to commit to 100% clean energy.

Smoke rising above trees

It's the 11th hour for climate and Congress

The climate crisis seems to be getting worse, but we also know there is a window of time right now when we can still make a big positive difference.

Sunset over a smoky sky

Rein in the biggest polluters, avert climate chaos

Oregon's Department of Environmental Quality has been developing rules to hold our state's biggest polluters accountable for the first time, but we're losing ground to industry lobbyists.

Photo of sunrise over Steens Mountain - Little Blitzen Gorge, 2016

So… What just happened in Salem?

Oregon’s 2021 legislative session has come to a close. We’ve made some major progress on statewide climate action, but before we dive into those details, let’s talk about how we got here.

Bird and flowers

Time to tell Congress: no climate action, no deal

This really may be our best and last chance to pass the climate investments we need at the federal level. Act now!

Photo of Freightliner eCascadia electric heavy duty truck on Fremont Bridge, Portland, Oregon USA

Keeping the momentum going on clean transportation

Oregon passed two clean transportation bills so far this year, but our work isn’t over.

Roseburg sunrise photo

WE DID IT: 100% clean energy for all Oregonians

HUGE NEWS from Salem!! House Bill 2021, which commits Oregon to 100% clean, carbon-free energy by 2040, was just passed by the state legislature!

climate cast banner + photo of TriMet all-electric bus

Keystone XL is kaput

TriMet doubles down on clean electricity, Keystone XL pipeline is cancelled, and carmakers up the ante on EVs.

Sunset over a smoky sky

It's the 11th hour for climate action in Salem

23 days. That’s how much time is left in the legislative session in Salem.    97° F. That’s the record-breaking temperature in Salem on June 1st.

Photo of sunrise over Steens Mountain - Little Blitzen Gorge, 2016

So… What just happened in Salem?

Oregon’s 2021 legislative session has come to a close. We’ve made some major progress on statewide climate action, but before we dive into those details, let’s talk about how we got here.
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